IOP Working with UK Libraries to Off-Set Open Access Fees

iop-logo-fullsizeIOP Publishing announced that it has begun work with a consortium of libraries in the UK (Research Libraries UK and the Russell Group) in a 3-year pilot aimed at reducing library expenditures for hybrid journal publications.   Early in the pilot IOP will offset 90% of a university’s expenditure in that year on article processing charges (APC) or the full cost of the subscription, whichever is greater.  Over time, as open access content in the various IOP journals grows, it is expected that subscription costs will be reduced further, and this benefit should shift towards all of IOP’s customers.  The 21 libraries collaborating at this early stage should see the most benefit.

 

Nature Publishes Special Issue: The Future of Publishing

Nature‘s latest special issue, The Future of Publishing (March 28th, 2013), addresses the many benefits, as well as some perils (identity theft of a scholarly journal!), found in an increasingly digital world of scholarly publishing.  Articles on open access literature and data discuss the role transformations required of researchers and libraries in this changing landscape.  Another raises logical questions about the high cost and relative value of scholarly publishers arising when inexpensive open access is an option.  One article highlights the enhanced discovery, as well as more elemental packaging, of article/research content allowed by open access and search engine enhancements.  Public access advocates give their prescriptions for pushing forward in this realm, while others address the straw men thrown up by those opposed to the Creative Commons attribution license. An interview with Robert Darnton, Director of the Harvard University Library, anticipates the April 18 – 19 launch of the Digital Public Library of America. 

Science Special Issue: Dealing with Data

The February 11th (2011) issue of the journal, Science, has a special focus, Dealing with Data. Articles from this issue, augmented by others appearing in Science Signaling, Science Translational Medicine, and Science Careers, have been collected and made freely available. With scientific innovation increasingly recognized as central in dealing with such important societal issues as climate change and global public health, to name just two, greater accountability and transparency are required of the sciences, with better management and access to data recognized as central to achieving these goals. In addition to the need for improved access to data, articles over a range of scientific disciplines speak to the need for intelligent archiving decisions, given the deluge of data and the impossibility now of storing it all. There is a call for leadership on these issues from funders, societies, journals, educators, and individual scientists—and from society at large. The costs of losing data are tremendous, just as the opportunities in better management and availability are great.

Nature Publishing Offering Open Access Options for More Journals

Nature Publishing Group (NPG) has just announced the addition of seven more journals to its list of of titles offering an open access option, bringing the total to 25 for this publisher. Authors can choose to publish their articles as open access by payment of an article processing charge (APC). APC charges vary according to the selectivity of the journal; more information can be found on each journal page. The new titles include American Journal of Gastroenterology, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Gene Therapy, International Journal of Obesity, Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Oncogene, and Leukemia. Authors are offered a choice of licenses (including one allowing for derivative works), as well as immediate and permanent public access to the final published version of their paper on nature.com and in PubMed Central and the rights to self-archive the final published version of their paper for public access immediately upon publication. Nature’s self-archiving policy provides for authors publishing in any of the 43 Nature titles to comply with funder mandates.

Wiley Adds Natural Disaster Clause for Emergency Access

John S. Wiley, Inc., one of the world’s largest publishers of scientific, technical and medical journals, has just announced the addition of a natural disaster clause to its licenses, ensuring continued access to subscribed electronic content for “emergency workers, students, faculty, and academic institutions” displaced in the wake of a local, national or global extreme event. Wiley has previously provided emergency access following Hurricane Katrina, tsunamis in Southeast Asia and the recent earthquake in Haiti; this clause will now extend that protection to all of its managed licenses. The addition of this clause provides an added level of perpetual access protection for electronic content.

Nature Chemistry Commentary on Scholarly Communication in Chemistry

In its Dec. 20th, 2009, issue (pp 673 – 678), the journal, Nature Chemistry, published “Communicating Chemistry” (by Theresa Velden and Carl Lagoze), a commentary on the recent workshop, “New Models for Scholarly Communication”, held in Washington, D.C., Oct. 23 – 24, 2009. (This workshop is described more fully in the publicly-accessible white paper, The Value of New Scientific Communication Models for Chemistry.) The paper discusses characteristics of the discipline of chemistry and how communication patterns, rewards systems, research practices, reliance on proprietary databases for literature and data access, strong scholarly societies (the American Chemical Society and the Royal Society of Chemistry, in particular), and the balance between industry and academia might all have an influence on the acceptance of public access to literature and data in the chemical sciences, as well as on adoption of newer web-based scholarly communication models.

Discussions leading up to the final publication of the white paper showed the controversy surrounding the questions of whether and how chemistry might benefit from new models for science communication, and about what the characteristics of chemistry research and scholarship are that will shape its future communication system. As a result, the white paper reflects some of the aspects of this controversy and presents a perspective on it, rather than a consensus among all of the workshop participants.

Nature Chemistry Commentary on Scholarly Communication in Chemistry

In its Dec. 20th, 2009, issue (pp 673 – 678), the journal, Nature Chemistry, published “Communicating Chemistry” (by Theresa Velden and Carl Lagoze), a commentary on the recent workshop, “New Models for Scholarly Communication”, held in Washington, D.C., Oct. 23 – 24, 2009. (This workshop is described more fully in the publicly-accessible white paper, The Value of New Scientific Communication Models for Chemistry.) The paper discusses characteristics of the discipline of chemistry and how communication patterns, rewards systems, research practices, reliance on proprietary databases for literature and data access, strong scholarly societies (the American Chemical Society and the Royal Society of Chemistry, in particular), and the balance between industry and academia might all have an influence on the acceptance of public access to literature and data in the chemical sciences, as well as on adoption of newer web-based scholarly communication models.

Discussions leading up to the final publication of the white paper showed the controversy surrounding the questions of whether and how chemistry might benefit from new models for science communication, and about what the characteristics of chemistry research and scholarship are that will shape its future communication system. As a result, the white paper reflects some of the aspects of this controversy and presents a perspective on it, rather than a consensus among all of the workshop participants.

New SPARC Site Focused on Campus-Based Open-access Publishing Funds

SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, has published a web site devoted to Campus-based Open-access Publishing Funds. These are funds set aside by an institution in support of publishing models providing public-access to scholarly output. The site serves as a guide to this type of funding effort, with an overview, institutional examples, template documents for use in creating such funds and recent news.

Cell Death & Disease, New Open-Access Journal from Nature Publishing Group

Nature Publishing Group has introduced its first all open-access, peer-reviewed journal, Cell Death & Disease, from the editorial team of Cell Death and Differentiation.

From the Cell Death and Disease web site:

Cell Death & Disease makes all content freely available to all researchers worldwide, ensuring maximum dissemination of content through the nature.com platform. Content is published online on a weekly basis to provide timely communication to the community and keep publication times to a minimum.

Authors can choose either the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 licence or a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 licence. Publication is funded by article-processing charges of £2,000 / $3,000 / €2,400 for original articles and unsolicited reviews. Correspondence articles and other unsolicited articles are published at a reduced fee (£670 / $1000 / €800).